Archive for the ‘technology’ Category

25 Oct 2017

Privacy Tech-Know Blog: Seeing A Different World: The Possibilities Associated with Augmented and Virtual Reality


Phones, glasses, and headsets can now all either overlay information on the world we’re looking at or immerse us entirely in imaginary ones. The processes of overlaying information, termed ‘augmented reality’, can be seen when Pokémon appear on our mobile phones, directions appear for nearby restaurants, or our food’s nutritional information is displayed when we point our camera at our plate.

The full immersion into alternate worlds, termed ‘virtual reality’, can let us look around a space, play games with others in simulated cockpits, or climb mountain ranges. Both technologies present novel opportunities to experience the world while simultaneously raising questions about how our data is collected or used. Whereas Augmented Reality (AR) routinely presents information on top of our real-world environment, virtual reality (VR) replaces that environment entirely. The technologies underlying AR and VR share some commonalities but the ways in which they collect and process data are different.

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21 Aug 2017

Privacy Tech-Know Blog: Cookieless Identification and Tracking of Devices


We are regularly told to block or ‘clear our cookies’, or use a private browsing mode, if we don’t want to be tracked as we visit websites. Website operators and marketing, advertising, and other tracking companies, however, have developed other ways of tracking us, called ‘fingerprinting’, which work even if you clear or block your cookies. How prevalent is this kind of cookieless tracking? How accurate is it? And what are the implications for our ability to control our personal information and protect our privacy interests?

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17 Jul 2017

Privacy Tech-Know Blog: Can We Still Be ‘Just Another Face In The Crowd’?


Facial recognition technologies can quickly identify who you are by automatically analyzing your facial features. The characteristics of your face (your biometric information) may be collected when you apply for an identity document like a passport, when you get your photo taken for an employee badge, or when you upload photos online to social media websites.

Given how many opportunities there are to record our faces, it is time to ask: can we remain anonymous in a crowd?

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13 Jun 2017

Privacy Tech-Know Blog: Who’s Watching Where You’re Driving?


When you drive down the road or park your car, have you considered who might be recording where your car was at any given time, and where that information is stored and shared? Public agencies and private companies are using Automated Licence Plate Recognition (ALPR) systems to track vehicles throughout Canada, today.

ALPR systems have privacy implications because they record where specific vehicles are at given times, often without the driver realizing that such information is being captured.

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