Archive for the ‘privacy education’ Category

21 Aug 2017

Privacy Tech-Know Blog: Cookieless Identification and Tracking of Devices


We are regularly told to block or ‘clear our cookies’, or use a private browsing mode, if we don’t want to be tracked as we visit websites. Website operators and marketing, advertising, and other tracking companies, however, have developed other ways of tracking us, called ‘fingerprinting’, which work even if you clear or block your cookies. How prevalent is this kind of cookieless tracking? How accurate is it? And what are the implications for our ability to control our personal information and protect our privacy interests?

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17 Jul 2017

Privacy Tech-Know Blog: Can We Still Be ‘Just Another Face In The Crowd’?


Facial recognition technologies can quickly identify who you are by automatically analyzing your facial features. The characteristics of your face (your biometric information) may be collected when you apply for an identity document like a passport, when you get your photo taken for an employee badge, or when you upload photos online to social media websites.

Given how many opportunities there are to record our faces, it is time to ask: can we remain anonymous in a crowd?

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1 Mar 2017

Don’t miss the Pathways to Privacy Research Symposium 2017


On Friday, March 10, 2017, the Behavioural Economics in Action at Rotman (BEAR) group at the University of Toronto will bring together academics, researchers, regulators, and industry and consumer groups alike to address consumer privacy challenges in the online world.

Patricia Kosseim, Senior General Counsel, OPC

Funded through the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s (OPC) Contributions Program, the BEAR group will host a symposium highlighting the privacy challenges that consumers face every day while on the Internet.

“Online Privacy: A Human-Centred Approach” will be the theme of the day, and the symposium will feature recent research funded by the OPC’s Contributions Program and explore the key factors—cognitive, contextual, and social—that underlie consumers’ decisions to share their personal information online.

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