Archive for the ‘Child protection online’ Category

19 Sep 2016

Children’s Privacy Sweep yields positive changes


So whatever happened with that Children’s Privacy Sweep, you ask?

Before we delve into the results of the 2016 Internet of Things Sweep—look out for them very soon—we thought we should update you on the outcome of our discussions with developers behind the mobile applications (apps) and websites we raised concerns about in a blog post and/or letters issued last fall.

Read the rest of this entry »


2 Sep 2015

Who did it better? A look at children’s apps/websites and the privacy protective controls on offer


Children are more connected than ever and often miles ahead of their parents when it comes to navigating the Internet and mobile applications (apps).

They’re also among our most vulnerable demographic groups and, in their quest to access their favourite game or social network, they may be apt to give out personal information without any thought to the potential privacy ramifications.

For this reason, the Global Privacy Enforcement Network made Children’s Privacy the theme of its 3rd annual Privacy Sweep.

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, along with 28 other privacy enforcement authorities across the country and around the globe, assessed the privacy communications and practices of some 1,494 websites and mobile apps.

The goal: to find out which of them collect personal information, what type of personal information they collect, whether protective controls exist to limit the collection and whether a simple means to delete account information exists.

By briefly interacting with the websites and apps, the exercise was meant to recreate the consumer experience – in this case, the experience of children under the age of 12. Our sweepers, which included a number of adult volunteers as well as nine children, ultimately sought to assess privacy controls based on four key indicators:

  1. Collection of children’s data: Does the app/website collect children’s personal information and if so, what information is collected? (Ex. Name, email, date of birth, address, phone number, photo/video/audio.) Does a privacy policy or other privacy communications exist and if so, does it clearly explain the app/website’s personal information handling practices?
  2. Protective controls: Do protective controls exist and do they effectively limit the collection of personal data? (Ex. Prompts for parental involvement, warnings when leaving the site, pre-made avatars/usernames, moderated chats/message boards to prevent inadvertent sharing of personal information.) Are privacy communications tailored to children? (Ex. Simple language, large print, audio, animation.)
  3. Means to delete account information: Is there a simple means for deleting account information?
  4. Overall concerns about a child using the app/website: Overall, would I be comfortable with a child using this app/website?

In total, our Office examined 172 websites and mobile apps for both Android and iOS platforms. We focused on websites and apps that are targeted at or popular among children 12 and under.

Some 118 websites and apps appeared to be targeted directly at children, while 54 were considered popular among them. In other words, while designed for older audiences or audiences of all ages, children are said to be frequent users of these apps and websites.

The bulk of websites and apps swept were based in Canada and the United States. Our Sweep included a significant number of games and educational websites and apps, as well as leisure websites and apps hosted, for example, by museums or zoos. Traditional and social media apps and websites rounded out the list.

Before delving in, let’s be clear on a few points: Since apps and websites are constantly evolving, it’s best to think about our results as a snapshot in time. Also note that the Sweep was not a formal investigation. We did not seek to conclusively identify compliance issues or possible violations of privacy legislation. This was not an assessment of an app or website’s overall privacy practices, nor was it meant to provide an in-depth analysis of the design and development of the apps or websites examined.

Instead, we have compared and contrasted some of the web/app features and privacy practices that we found to be particularly kid-friendly, with those we felt could benefit from some “child-proofing.” We learned a lot and hope these concrete examples will help Canadians, as well as website and app developers, better understand our conclusions.

The moderated message/chat function:

Moderated message/chat functions ensure contributions are vetted before they are posted publicly. Items may be vetted for content but also for personal information as free-text portals can open the door to the inadvertent sharing of potentially sensitive details.

Family.ca, a site clearly targeted at children, indicated its message board feature was moderated. Our Sweepers put that claim to the test by attempting to post a message that included a full name, age and hometown. A day later, here’s the modified message that went public:

Family.ca image. Moderated message/chat function works effectively. Message was changed to exclude personal information.

As you can see, the site even cropped the username to “victorg.” Nice catch Family.ca.

We attempted the same experiment with Lego.com. As you can see, the moderator informed us that it had rejected our post for privacy reasons. Awesome moderating decision master-builder Emmet!

Lego.com image.

Kudos to Family.ca and Lego.com which have shown how a little moderation can go a long way!

By contrast, Moviestar Planet is an example of a social networking app targeted specifically at kids that displays little self-control. While the app said it is moderated for content, children were free to post selfies with titles asking, for example, others to rate them “hot or not.” Not the sort of thing you might necessarily want out there on the Internet when you grow up. We won’t display those images to protect the privacy of the children, but you can also see how our sweeper was able to include a whole lot of personal information in the free-text chat function. Big no no! What’s stopping kids from entering their address, school or where they plan to be that afternoon?

Moviestar Planet image.

Meanwhile, sweepers noticed that websites/apps that are popular among children may moderate for certain content but not to ensure that children aren’t sharing personal details about themselves online. The website for FIFA, soccer’s governing body and a site popular with soccer fans of all ages, for instance, moderates its site to ensure that there are no violations of the Terms of Service. But as you can see below, our sweeper was able to state his age and location. Therefore this reference to moderation has more to do with the appropriateness of the content . . . You know how partisan soccer fans can get!

FIFA image.

The website’s Terms of Service also states that it is the responsibility of parents to supervise their children’s activities on the site and that appears to be as far as FIFA’s obligation goes towards moderating the content that children may be sharing. Certainly parents have a role to play in protecting children’s privacy while online, but seriously FIFA, you are not absolved from getting in the game. If you’re already moderating for content, why not make sure kids aren’t oversharing too? This serious foul deserves a red card.

Less is more:

Leave a little mystery! Profile displays do not have to give everything away.

GamezHero.com is an example of a targeted website that allows users to display a significant amount of personal information on their user profile including name, grade, gender, age and city. While the website said it does not collect from children under 13, it had no problem posting our 10-year-old’s information. Fortunately, there was no option to load a photo!

GamezHero.com image.

A similar interface on Family.ca, however, had limited options for sharing personal information. The photo was a preset graphic and messages were fixed text. In other words, kids could choose what to say from a list of phrases.

Family.ca (Less is More) image.

Things can get a little trickier with popular apps and websites. Even though many children use these sites, they are often not designed with the under 12 crowd in mind. Gurl.com is one such example. As you can see, the social platform geared at teen girls collected and posted our 10-year-old sweeper’s full name, date of birth, occupation and location.

There were also no warnings or mechanisms to prevent users from uploading photos or posting personal information on message boards, some of which broach some pretty sensitive topics such as depression, suicide and self-mutilation. Given the lack of protective controls, there’s no telling what children could post and who might see it, raising all sorts of questions about the potential for harm to one’s reputation and well-being.

Gurl.com image.

For an otherwise pretty kid-friendly website, we found this next example worth mentioning. Santasvillage.ca offered kids an easy way to “get on Santa’s nice list” – by coughing up their full name and email address. In exchange, it promised to bombard subscribers with marketing materials. Not cool Santa, we’ll take the coal.

Santasvillage.ca image.

Avatars:

Selecting an image that will serve as your online identity doesn’t have to be personal. PBSkids.org is an example of a targeted website that asked our sweeper to choose from a pre-set list of icons.

PBS.org image.

Other websites/apps asked sweepers to load their own avatar which opens the door to using personal photographs. For example, the Cookie Monster Challenge app prompted us to take a selfie for our profiles. The app’s generic privacy policy also suggested personal information may be shared with third parties.

As the Cookie Monster himself might say: Parents not like when Cookie gobble up sensitive personal information like photograph and share with udder monsters.

Cookie Monster Challenge image 1.  Cookie Monster Challenge image 2.

All in a name:

Just as children should be discouraged from using a personal photo online, so too should they be discouraged from using their real name.

Websites such as Harry Potter fan site, Pottermore.com, don’t give kids the option. Instead, our sweepers were encouraged to select a username from a pre-set list. Thanks for thinking about the privacy of your younger Hogwarts classmates, Harry!

Pottermore.com (All in a name) image.

Meanwhile, Classdojo.com, a classroom management site that connects teachers, students and their parents, got a gold star for advising sweepers in simple, child-friendly language not to use their real name. But unfortunately that gold star got yanked as there was no actual mechanism to prevent us from using it.

Classdojo.com image.

Parental control:

On the subject of parental control, there are some effective ways to limit the functionality of a website or app to protect privacy. A great way to do that is with a parental dashboard and here are a few examples that put parents in the privacy driver’s seat.

The first was Grimm’s Red Riding Hood, an app targeted at children that allowed parents to turn certain settings on and off, such as in app purchases and access to the store.

Grimm's Red Riding Hood image.

Another example is Battle.net, a popular game website designed for children over the age of 13, even though younger children are known to frequent it. As long as young users have provided a valid parental email address, parents can control settings through a fairly comprehensive dashboard.

Battle.net image shows parental dashboard to control privacy settings and voice chat.

On social networking site GeckoLife.com, parents of young children must register an account, to which they can add a child.

GeckoLife.com image shows request message sent to parents when child asks to open an account.

Parents could also monitor their child’s activities, including media uploads and connections with other users, however, the website collected a fair bit of personal information in the process.

GeckoLife.com image shows parental dashboard to set permissions to upload media and contact other users. Also asks for child`s full name,  sex and date of birth.

Now just as the First Year kids at Hogwarts require parental permission for weekend trips to Hogsmeade, young Pottermore.com users need parental permission to activate their account. Of course that means deploying a summoning charm: Accio parental email address. Good job on involving mum and dad!

But this website didn’t just seek mum or dad’s email address, it also asked for the child’s first name, country, date of birth and which Harry Potter books and movies you’ve read or watched before sending the parental consent link via email. Is all that information really necessary, Harry?

Pottermore.com (Parental Control) image.

The American Girl doll website had options to collect personal information through quizzes and sweepstakes, but to post a photo of your child with their favourite doll, parents had to provide a signed waiver.

American Girl image 1.

American Girl image 2.

These other apps clearly targeted directly at children have found some creative ways to keep wee ones out of adult sections of the site, though they do so assuming young users can’t read or follow very basic instructions! Consider making it a little tougher. Don’t forget, some wee ones are learning how to swipe a tablet screen before they can walk!

Parental control says area is for grown-ups only and asks user to enter three numbers.

Parental control says area is for grownups and asks user to swipe left with two fingers anywhere on the screen.

Delete:

What seems so simple is often anything but. To put it mildly, not all delete functions are equal. From “no brainer” to “not an option,” here’s a look at our sliding scale when it comes to ease of deleting.

For some apps/websites, it was as easy as the click of a button. Take Quizlet.com for example. This educational website allows users to sign up and join study groups on a variety of topics. But when you’re done, you simply had to click the settings button in the top right corner, scroll down and hit delete.

Quizlet.com image.

Others required a multistep process that could involve emails and/or phone calls to the company. Buried in the middle of its privacy policy is the delete option for targeted game app Despicable Me: Minion Rush.

Despicable Me: Minion Rush image 1.

Stardoll.com, a website targeted at children that allows them to create dolls and interact with other users, requires parents/guardians to fill out a form. As you might be wondering from reading this excerpt from its privacy policy, it’s not clear whether the company actually destroys the personal information it has collected or whether it simply stops collecting, using and disclosing it to third parties. Given the amount of information this site collects and displays – country, gender, date of birth and anything through its free-text function – this raised some serious concerns for sweepers.

Stardoll.com image.

Unfortunately many popular websites and apps that collect personal information had no apparent means for deleting account data, leading our sweepers to believe that their information would be out there in the ether in perpetuity.

Off course:

It’s no surprise that kids like to click on shiny colourful things which many apps and websites have in spades. What’s not cool is when those shiny colourful things lead kids to places with different personal information collection practices or questionable content.

Redirection off-site often occurs through an ad or contest icon that sometimes appears to be part of the original site.

About a third of apps did not redirect users. Bravo! Meanwhile, 14 percent of them, including Barbie.com, at least provided a pop-up warning.

Barbie.com image.

Others had more questionable redirection practices. For instance some websites/apps, including ones targeted directly at children, had ads for alcohol or dating websites that could lead users astray if clicked on. Some even had non-descript icons that, if clicked on, led sweepers to other sites that contained graphic and violent videos. Scary!

BONUS: Battle of the bands

Pop idols Justin Bieber, Taylor Swift and One Direction are all hugely popular among the under 12 crowd. But which fan site best bears that in mind when it comes to protecting the privacy of their youngest Beliebers, Swifties and Directioners?

Based on our indicators, here’s how these musical magnates stacked up.

Taylorswift.com collected username, email, full name, photo, date of birth, city, gender and occupation. There was also an unmoderated free-text function in which users could type in whatever they like. The site could display your username, photo and city. While the site attempted to block users under the age of 13, the measure could be easily circumvented by keying in a different date of birth. It also redirected visitors to a half dozen social media sites, the Google Play Store and another Taylor Swift shop that separately collects a whole host of personal information. Finally, according to the website’s privacy policy, users could “access, update or delete” personal information via email. It also noted this could be done via the “my account” area of the website. That would be great. Too bad we couldn’t actually find a delete button.

Justinbiebermusic.com could collect a fan’s first name, email, date of birth, postal code and country. It too barred users under 13 but that measure could be similarly circumvented. The site also had links redirecting users to a variety of music and social media sites, including the pop star’s Facebook fan page. To “correct, update, amend, delete/remove” personal information, users are asked to send a letter via snail mail to an address in California, or to fill out an online form. It said users could also do it through the member information page, but no such page could be found.

Onedirectionmusic.com, meanwhile, did not collect any personal information directly on site, though users could be redirected to a number of social media and music sites. The One Direction store, however, did collect a variety of personal information.

We are certainly not trying to create any “Bad Blood,” despite Taylor Swift’s lyrics, but it seems as though all three sites could use some helicopter parenting! That said, according to our final indicator, OPC sweepers said they were most comfortable with the One Direction site which seemed to hit the higher privacy notes of the three. Too bad the band has broken up:( Or so we think!

While we recognize that age verification can be tough as crafty kids have found clever ways around such mechanisms, we commend One Direction for simply limiting collection. Remember, don’t collect if you don’t have to. We also observed other sites that recognized a user’s URL and barred them from going back to the site and simply entering a different age for a period of time in order to gain access to the site. Others automatically redirected young users to a children’s version of the site. While many protective controls are seldom fool proof, we encourage developers to be creative and to find new ways of using technology to protect our most vulnerable.

Final thoughts . . .

As you can see, sweepers here at the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada found many great examples of websites and mobiles apps that do not collect personal information whatsoever. We believe there are many effective ways to at least limit collection.

When it comes to protecting the privacy of children online, everybody has a role to play. Children themselves need to be educated about digital privacy issues and the perils of sharing personal information online. Teachers and parents can help instill this knowledge and should themselves be aware of what sites and apps their kids are using and what types of information they are being asked to hand over. Finally, developers should be mindful of who their users are and limit, if not eliminate, the collection of personal information from children through the use of innovative privacy protective controls.

Once we’ve finished sorting through our results, in conjunction with our provincial and international partners who are doing the same, we will determine any appropriate follow-up action.

As with last year’s Sweep, our follow-up activities could include reaching out to organizations to inform them of our findings and making suggestions for improvements. We also have the option to pursue enforcement action.

By the way, we wrote to the companies mentioned in the blog before posting this to share our concerns. Past experience has shown that education and outreach alone can often go a long way towards effecting positive change for privacy.

 


2 Sep 2015

Child sweepers share observations on web/mobile app privacy


Commissioner Daniel Therrien visits with children during Kids Privacy Sweep.

Privacy Commissioner of Canada Daniel Therrien pops in on Global Privacy Enforcement Network Children’s Privacy Sweep where a few kids are on hand to help.

A children’s privacy sweep with no children? In the words of cartoon curmudgeon Charlie Brown, “good grief!”

. . . and that was roughly genesis of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada’s (OPC) first ever Kid’s Sweep.

Nine youngsters, the offspring of OPC employees who also participated in the Sweep, descended on 30 rue Victoria one early May morning during International Sweep Week.

Fuelled on promises of pizza and cookies, the seven to 13-year-old boys and girls parked themselves in front of the laptop or tablet of their choice. Their job? To interact with their favorite apps and websites, thus recreating the user experience under the watchful gaze of their parents who took notes on how they navigated the privacy settings, or lack thereof, as the case happened to be for some sites.

The following is an edited transcript of what the kids, and their parents, had to say during a post-Sweep debrief before the smell of hot cheese and pepperoni wafted into the room and snatched their attention.

Did you have fun?

“Yeaaah!” (Kids shout in unison.)

Was anything hard or frustrating?

“It was hard to read privacy policies; they were really long and boring.”

Was it hard to sign up for some of the websites?

“If you are under 13, you are redirected to (the kid’s version of the website.)” Mom proceeded to explain that her son nonetheless managed to find a work-around.

What were some of the personal questions the website or app asked you?

“Where do you go to school? What’s your address?”

“It asked if you’re a student or a teacher.”

“It asked what gender you were.”

“Date of birth.”

“(On one website), if you typed in your real name, it wouldn’t take it or any short form of the name.”

“My photo.” (Mom added: “I wouldn’t let him. I shut it down real fast.”)

“It asked for what grade you were in.”

“(One website) asked for your picture but we just used a picture of a penguin that was already saved on the computer.” (Mom added: “But then it encouraged you to use a real picture.”)

Boy at computer.Did you always understand what the website or app was asking for?

“When I was working on (one website), I thought there were games made by other people that you could play but it was just shopping. That’s where there was the long and boring parts.”

Did any websites or apps tell you to go get a parent to help you?

“Before you were able to get on (one website), they send an email to your parent.” Mom added: “And the parent had to confirm.”

“On one website there’s a privacy mode so if you’re under 13, you can’t change it. If you want to change your age, you have to ask a parent by email.”

Did you ever click on something that led you to a totally different website?

“I was on (one website) and there was this little thing on the top of the page that said ‘are you a boy or a girl.’ It didn’t really look like an ad but it was just like a little thing with a picture and so, of course, we clicked on it and it went to another game website and it showed you a trailer.” Mom added that it was “teen rated” and included a warning that the content contained “violence, blood, partial nudity and alcohol.”

If you had to sign up for an account, did the website or app make it easy to delete your account when you were done?

“I was on (one website) and there was an option to delete the account and it deleted right away.”

Did anybody have trouble?

“A little bit. You had to email the company to delete it.”

– – – – –

Days after the Kids Sweep we got some great feedback from one of our parental sweepers who quipped that her kids are now tattling on each other for failing to read privacy policies. She added:

“They had a really good time and learned a lot about thinking critically when it comes to their personal information. If the result is that they make one brighter choice about their own privacy, then it was 100 percent worth it to me.”

It was this very comment that inspired one of our post-Sweep follow-up activities. The OPC has drafted a classroom activity for Grade 7 and 8 teachers across Canada based on our 2015 Kids Sweep.

We’ve simplified the Sweep form used to assess the privacy communications of apps and websites and are encouraging teachers to conduct privacy sweeps with students using the forms as a way to kick off a discussion about online privacy and the protection of personal information.

Alone or in groups, we are encouraging students to “sweep” their favorite apps and websites, to learn how to read privacy policies, to learn about tracking, the different types of personal information that might be collected and to discuss their observations with their teacher and peers. We’ve also provided a take-home tip sheet dubbed Pro Tips for Kids: Protecting Your Privacy for students and their parents.
Mother and daughter at computer.

Note to teachers: you can find the classroom activity on our website. As for parents and guardians, if it’s not something your kids are learning in school, think about adapting the lesson plan as a rainy Sunday afternoon activity!

Intimate, controversial or embarrassing photos and comments can have a lasting impact on a person’s reputation. Today, digital literacy as is as important as learning your ABCs and kids who understand and implement safe online privacy practices are less likely to make the sort of mistakes that could haunt them in the future.

Click here for more on the results of this year’s Children’s Privacy Sweep.


3 Oct 2014

Cybersecurity Awareness Month 2014


October 1st marked the start of Cybersecurity Awareness Month.  It’s an opportunity to share tips and tools to help people stay more safe and secure online.

Throughout October, we’ll be highlighting the resources we have available to encourage Canadians to be more privacy- and cybersecurity-conscious.  On our blog, among other things, we’ll look at innovative cybersecurity research projects funded through our Contributions Program, we’ll let you know how young people are protecting their privacy online, and we’ll highlight what small-and medium-sized businesses can do when it comes to protecting personal data.

So, throughout the month, keep up with us on Twitter (@privacyprivee) and on our blog for more information on privacy and cybersecurity.   Also be sure to check out Public Safety Canada’s cybersecurity website.


5 Sep 2014

It’s back to school!


Looking for ways to kick the school year off right?

Start with a reminder to kids that privacy matters! Canadian kids are digitally savvy and they value their privacy, but they can sometimes be unsuspecting about the potential privacy risks of new digital communications technologies.

Our office has created a graphic novel, Social Smarts: Privacy, the Internet and You, to help young Canadians better understand and navigate privacy issues in the online world.

Social SmartsParents and educators can also take advantage of our new discussion guide and privacy activity sheets to generate more in-depth discussions on the privacy risks related to social networking, mobile devices and texting, and online gaming. These tools also provide ample opportunities to raise real-life situations in which privacy can be impacted.

Because kids go online earlier in life than ever before, the privacy activity sheets vary in difficulty, from very simple (a colouring page) to more difficult (a simple cryptography activity).

You can find these and more on the Youth Privacy section of our site!


29 Apr 2013

Grappling with the impact technology is having on privacy


This week is Privacy Awareness Week (PAW) – a global effort, coordinated by members of the Asia Pacific Privacy Authorities (APPA), to raise awareness about the value of privacy and the importance of protecting it.

For PAW 2013, APPA created an infographic that illustrates how technology has changed the way we communicate, do business and store information, and how this has introduced new privacy risks as a result.

It is an issue that many are thinking about. According to OPC’s recent survey, Canadians are increasingly anxious about their privacy in the face of new technology, and 70 per cent of them feel they have less protection of their personal information than they did 10 years ago. The research also indicates that Canadians avoid downloading apps or using certain websites and services due to privacy concerns.

What can we do?

It is true that consumers expect protections when they use products and services, but it is important to also realize that consumers have an important role to play and need to take an active approach when it comes to protecting their personal information. The best thing anyone can do, when using technology to collect or store personal information, is to understand the privacy risks that come with that technology. And here are some resources to help with that task:

Mobile App: We use our mobile devices to store a goldmine of personal information. To learn more about how to protect the personal information on your mobile device, download the OPC’s free myPRIVACYapp.

Video: Privacy and Social Networks: Do you know what happens to your personal information once you post it on to social networking sites? Watch this video that OPC created to understand how social networking sites make money off of your personal information. It may cause you to ask yourself some tough questions the next time you update your information online.

Infographic: 10 tips for preventing identity theft: Anyone who has personal information is at risk of identity theft, and the risks are higher now that we use technology for so many purposes. And while it’s impossible to entirely eliminate the risk of becoming a victim, it is possible to reduce it. The OPC’s infographic details 10 things you can do to prevent yourself from becoming a target.

Introduction to Cloud Computing: When you store your photos online instead of on your home computer, or use webmail or a social networking site, you are using a “cloud computing” service. The OPC’s fact sheet explains the privacy implications of this.

For more information on the privacy risks that come with technology, and on how to protect yourself, visit the OPC’s page of fact sheets covering a range of issues and topics.


8 Apr 2013

Surveillance technologies and children


A complaint investigation about a daycare that offered webcam monitoring to parents caused us to consider the prevalence of high tech surveillance tools in the day-to-day lives of children. Specifically, we wondered how technical surveillance might affect kids’ feelings about privacy.

To gain some insight into this issue, we examined current research on the effects of surveillance on children and youth. The resulting paper is Surveillance technologies and children.

The research we examined raised questions about the potential effects of surveillance on children’s social development in the long term, particularly as it pertains to children’s feelings of trust and autonomy. Some research suggested that persistent surveillance could even result in children not knowing how to establish their own privacy, or recognize the privacy of others.

But it seems that this area is only beginning to be studied. We would like to see more research being done on this subject, taking into account children of different age groups and varying levels of surveillance. Having more information about how surveillance impacts children’s attitudes, life skills, moral development, and sense of privacy would help parents find the appropriate balance between protecting their children and respecting their children’s need for independence and privacy. It might also focus more attention on those who track our children for less altruistic purposes, like for profit.

Have a read, and let us know in the comments: Do you think surveillance of children has an impact on their long-term development? We would love to hear from you.


26 Sep 2012

New presentation helps kids in grades 4 to 6 understand their online footprint


Canadian kids are communicating online more than ever before, and are using tools like Skype sometimes even before they learn to walk. Many of us are astonished at how easily they adapt to new devices that connect to the Internet and at how these devices can quickly become part of their lives, as they use them to chat, surf, post, play and learn.

Many kids, however, don’t fully understand the impact that some online activities have on their privacy. They don’t understand the digital footprint they are leaving behind.

For this reason, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada has added a new component to its Protecting Your Online Rep presentation series. Today, we are launching Understanding Your Online Footprint: How to protect your personal information on the Internet, a presentation for young people in grades 4 to 6. The package includes slides, speaking notes and discussion topics for educators, community leaders and parents to speak with young people about online privacy.

The new presentation is packed with practical advice and features graphics and speaking notes that are tailored to the social realities and online activities of kids in grades 4 to 6. The goal of this tool is to help demonstrate how kids in this age group can use the Internet and have fun, without giving away too much of their personal information.

If you haven’t already checked them out, make sure to look at the presentation package for students in grades 7 and 8 (Secondary I to II in Quebec) and the presentation package for students in grades 9 to 12 (Secondary III to V in Quebec).

And if you have any questions or comments about our latest presentation, please let us know in the comments section below. Your feedback helps us improve the resources we develop.


6 Jun 2012

Graphic Novel: A New Tool to Help Younger Canadians Understand and Navigate Online Privacy


 

Graphic novel Cover: Social Smarts: Privacy, the Internet and You

The Privacy Commissioner has launched a new tool to help young Canadians understand and navigate privacy issues in the online world: a graphic novel entitled Social Smarts: Privacy, the Internet, and You.

The story follows Dave and Amy, a brother and sister who walk into their new school only to find that students they’ve never met before know all about them from their social network pages.

Guided by a talking smart phone, Dave, Amy and their classmates learn how their choices affect their reputations. In the end, they gain a better understanding of both what’s happening ‘behind the scenes’ and how to reduce the privacy risks associated with social networking, mobile devices, and online gaming.

Copies of the 12-page graphic novel – a first for our Office – can be downloaded from our website and printed.

The graphic novel complements a youth video, parent tips and a presentation package for educators released earlier this year.

To download a copy of the graphic novel, visit: youthprivacy.ca/en/gn_intro.html


5 Jun 2012

Evolving technologies creating new privacy risks for youth


Image of children speaking on cell phones

Young people are embracing new digital communication technologies at earlier and earlier ages.  While they recognize the importance of protecting their privacy, they’re often not aware of the potential privacy risks that can accompany these novel technologies.

A recent study found that a third of North American Gen-Y moms (aged 18 to 27) let their children use a laptop by age two. According to the Joan Ganz Center in New York, by age three, those laptops and tablets are connected to the Internet daily for about a quarter of U.S. kids. By age five, the proportion online soars to half.

But what is being done to educate these children to the privacy risks they face when they use online games, applications, social networks, mobile devices and geo-location?  

It’s critically important to empower our children to make well-informed decisions in this increasingly complex online environment.

In our 2011 Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act Annual Report, tabled today, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada focuses on children and youth privacy.

The report outlines our recent work on the issue, including our first investigation of a youth-oriented social networking site; investigations of three complaints against Facebook; as well as an investigation into a complaint about a daycare’s use of webcam monitoring.